OUR HISTORY

 

hitup_maddoxIt all started with hitching a ride on a train which brought Hitup Maddox and his brother to Florida.  After working in the phosphate mines for 13 years, Mr. Maddox borrowed money to start the operations in 1905. His vision was to have a one-stop shop - doing everything under one roof, ensuring quality and a good price every step of the way.  Over time, technologies have changed, but we remain committed to Mr. Maddox's vision for today and tomorrow.

Tradition:

Our tradition of serving our customers dates back to our very first order for a piston rod for a hand water pump in 1905. Since then, Maddox has produced custom parts, castings and machining for industries ranging from phosphate mining, sugar production, water works, transportation - including the Space Shuttle and trolley cars - and even the entertainment industry!

 

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Innovation:

Our founder Hitup Maddox envisioned a “One Stop Shop,” an innovative approach at the time. This meant that the customer’s work stayed on premise from beginning to end.  Today, this innovation continues, providing us the ability to manage the process to result in meeting and/or exceeding our customer’s expectations. We commit that their product will be completed on-site, on-time and more often than not, within budget.

 

Adaptation:

Although we can still do things the “old-fashioned way” – something that not everyone can claim – we integrate modern technology into our operations, such as Auto-CAD and computerized job monitoring and tracking. In our expansive warehouses, we maintain original drawings and patterns, and with the use of Auto-CAD, we can replicate them with pinpoint accuracy. valerie_monte

 

The Early Years

In addition to providing good-paying jobs, Maddox Foundry & Machine Works provided housing for its employees.  They also provided electricity and water for the residents of the city of Archer.  During World War II, they contributed to the war efforts, making shell casings from scrap metal.  Even the packing sand they use in the casting process can be used several times before returning it to the earth. Recycling, reclaiming and contributing – it’s not just a way of life at Maddox; it’s how we do quality business and provide value.

 

Family Traditions – 105 years – Still Growing and Going!

For five generations and 105 years, the Maddox Family has maintained ownership of a private free enterprise company that provides jobs, supports government and their community. They’re proud to call Archer, Florida home.

 

Connecting the Past – Maddox Foundry and The Thomas Center

cwchaseIn 1892, Hitup Maddox arrived in Florida without a shirt on his back or money in his pocket. Young, hard-working and ambitious, he worked in the phosphate mines for 90 cents a day for 13 years, fueled by his dream of establishing a foundry to build things the way he wanted them to be.  Although he saved his money, he needed additional capital to bring his dream to fruition.

Mr. Maddox took the local train to the big city of Gainesville to see Mr. C.W. Chase, the president of the Union Phosphate Company.  According to company historians, Mr. Maddox was very embarrassed to ask for support, but he finally requested the $625 needed to start the foundry, Mr. Chase completed the transaction by handing him the money, simply with a handshake.  Being an honest man, Hitup Maddox asked Mr. Chase what he needed for collateral to cover the “note.”  “Nothing, said Mr. Chase.  “You’ve worked in our mines for 13 years, that’s enough for me.”  That borrowed “note” helped launch the successful business.

In reflection of Mr. Chase’s support of the company, his picture hangs in our corporate offices to this day.  In addition, in each generation of Maddox, a child has been named “Chase” in his honor.

Prior to his death, Mr. Chase was the original owner/builder of what is known today as the Thomas Center, a private residence/hotel turned public facility for the City of Gainesville.  In 2010, the Thomas Center celebrates its centennial.  

Photo (left): Mr. C.W. Chase, supporter and benefactor of the Maddox Foundry & Machine Works